Raspberry Pi Sense Hat

I recently acquired a Sense Hat, and despite not having much use for it, i decided to have some fun and learning a little along the way. The hardware The Sense-hat is a little Hat for Raspberry Pi’s that contains a bunch of sensors, along with a small 8x8 RGB LED Matrix. It contains the following sensors: Gyroscope Accelerometer Magnetometer Temperature Barometric pressure Humidity Along with the hardware, there’s an official Sense-Hat Python library available. [Read More]

Scheduling lights with Phillips Hue revisited

When i last looked into automating the light control, i was using IFTTT, and decided to write my own implementation because IFTTT was not very precise, and rather limited for the finegrained control i wanted. A year has passed, and there’s a new version of the Phillips Hue Bridge which supports Apple HomeKit, and has a new version of the Hue API, which supports things like sunrise/sunset triggers. My own solution has been running on my Raspberry Pi for the better part of a year, and has worked very well, but with the new API it is possible for me to create the schedules directly on the Hue Bridge, removing the dependency on the Server, and allowing interaction from the Hue Apps. [Read More]

Editorial to Hugo workflow

In my previous post i described my new blog setup with Hugo, and mentioned that i loved the Editorial App for iOS for writing on the go. One of the reasons i’m in love with Editorial is the workflows, which combines a simple workflow engine (like Automator for Mac), with the powerfull scripting capabilities of Python. Editorial encourages it’s users to create new workflows, and share them on the Workflow Directory. [Read More]

There and back again

A tale of switching blogging platforms Preface I started this blog when i got a “free” Raspberry Pi hosted by the nice people at PCExtreme. Originally this blog was using Octopress because of the limited power provided by the Raspberry Pi and while it was never meant to be a high volume blog, i felt that static pages were the least CPU intensive. As time went by, i became increasingly more and more annoyed with the way Octopress was “a part” of my blog, and updating it involved pulling things from git and rebasing. [Read More]

Playing Around with Go

I’ve previously described my temperature monitoring solution, written in Python, and I’ve also described my various attempts at optimizing this solution, using NodeRED and Apache Camel, but all of these attempts have been focused on the server side, while the client has been mostly left to itself. The client runs on an old Raspberry Pi B+, with a total of 256MB RAM. The RPi also runs a surveillance camera, via the RPi camera module, which requires a memory split of 128 MB. [Read More]

Monitoring temperatures with Apache Camel

Intro I’ve been trying out various technologies for my temperature monitoring project, but all of them have been more or less unstable. The python solution is by far the most robust, but can lose connection to the MQTT broker, and stubbornly refuse to reconnect by itself. The Node-RED solution is, while fast to write, notoriously unstable regarding MQTT connections. Connections sit “idle” showing a connected state, while in fact they are disconnected, and there is no obvious way of reconnecting it - apart from restarting the docker container. [Read More]

UniFi Cloud Key review

Intro I’ve been running my UniFi controller off of a Raspberry Pi for a couple of years. It’s been running stable, and at no time did i feel it was underpowered for the task. Upgrading was a bit more cumbersome that i would have liked, but in the end it normally didn’t take longer than 10-15 minutes to perform an upgrade. When Ubiquiti announced the Cloud Key, which is essentially a Raspberry Pi 2 in an enclosure, with a POE option, i immediately knew i wanted one. [Read More]

Scheduling lights with Philips Hue and a Raspberry Pi

Up until a few weeks ago, i’ve been using IFTTT for controlling various automated light tasks. The lights i want to control are mostly outdoor lights, turning on at dusk, and off again at sunrise. I also automatically tone the light down and into a slight more red color in the kids rooms around bedtime, and in the living room a wee bit later :) IFTTT works, but is not very punctual. [Read More]

Temperature monitoring with Node-RED

I originally wrote my temperature monitoring software using Python, and while my Python solution works (almost) flawlessly, I recently became aware of Node-RED, a project initiated at IBM, meant as a controller for the Internet of things. When i read about Node-RED i wanted to try it out, so i decided to port my temperature/surveillance monitoring solution from python to Node-RED, and while i’m not much of a JavaScript fan, it actually worked out rather well. [Read More]

Monitoring temperatures with a Raspberry Pi.

I recently got into a discussion about dogs, kennels and temeratures. I have a German Shepherd, and he has a nice insulated dog house in his kennel, and the discussion was along the lines, how much heat does it take to warm up the doghouse, if it gets hotter than the outside at all. Now, a normal person would have solved this by putting a wireless meat thermometer in the doghouse, made a few readings of it with/without the dog, and compare it to the outside temperature. [Read More]